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Daniel Day-Lewis Net Worth

How rich is Daniel Michael Blake Day-Lewis?

Daniel Michael Blake Day-Lewis net worth:
$50 Million

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Daniel Michael Blake Day-Lewis net worth, biography & wiki:

Daniel Day-Lewis Net Worth: Daniel Day-Lewis is an English actor that has a net worth of $50 million dollars. He’s also appeared in such movies as “Gangs of New York”, “The Last of the Mohicans”, and “Nine”. Under his mom’s guidance (who was also an actress), Day Lewis made an early rise on earth of playing. He was just 13 when he performed in the film Sunday, Bloody Sunday (1971). Once he got the basics, Daniel Day-Lewis went to hone his acting abilities on the stage performing in Shakespeare’s, Marlowe’s as well as Farquer’s plays during his student days. Additionally, this is a ideal method of learning the best way to participate with complex characters and reveal theirs mental (and physical) changes on stage. The initial widespread notice Daniel had received was with his performances in the films “My Beautiful Laundrette” (1985) and “The Unbearable Likeness to Be” (1988). Daniel Day-Lewis is the primary male celebrity to win three Oscars for lead parts, reasoning with his successful performance in “Lincoln”. Daniel Day-Lewis has shown over the years he’s a committed and sophisticated performer who completely delves into his characters while staying exceptionally booked about his private life to the point of being secluded.


Daniel Michael Blake Day-Lewis information

Daniel Michael Blake Day-Lewis information

Birth date: April 29, 1957
Birth place: Greenwich, London, England, UK
Height:6' 2" (1.88 m)
Profession:Actor, Music Department, Soundtrack
Education:Bristol Old Vic Theatre School
Nationality:British, Irish
Spouse:Rebecca Miller
Siblings:Tamasin Day-Lewis

Daniel Michael Blake Day-Lewis profile links

Daniel Michael Blake Day-Lewis profile links


More about Daniel Michael Blake Day-Lewis:

  • Filmography
  • Awards
  • Salaries
  • Facts
  • Quotes
  • Trademarks
  • Pictures


Actor

Actor

TitleYearStatusCharacter
Untitled Paul Thomas Anderson Project2017filming
Lincoln2012Abraham Lincoln
Nine2009Guido Contini
There Will Be Blood2007Daniel Plainview
The Ballad of Jack and Rose2005Jack Slavin
Gangs of New York2002Bill 'The Butcher' Cutting
The Boxer1997Danny Flynn
The Crucible1996John Proctor
In the Name of the Father1993Gerry Conlon
The Age of Innocence1993Newland Archer
The Last of the Mohicans1992Hawkeye (Nathaniel Poe)
Eversmile, New Jersey1989Dr. Fergus O'Connell
My Left Foot1989Christy Brown
Stars and Bars1988Henderson Dores (as Daniel Day Lewis)
The Unbearable Lightness of Being1988Tomas
Nanou1986Max
Screen Two1986TV SeriesKafka
A Room with a View1985Cecil Vyse (as Daniel Day Lewis)
My Brother Jonathan1985TV SeriesJonathan Dakers
My Beautiful Laundrette1985Johnny (as Daniel Day Lewis)
The Bounty1984John Fryer
BBC Play of the Month1983TV SeriesGordon Whitehouse
Gandhi1982Colin (as Daniel Day Lewis)
Frost in May1982TV Mini-SeriesArchie Hughes-Forret
BBC2 Playhouse1982TV SeriesAlex
Artemis 811981TV MovieLibrary Student
Thank You, P.G. Wodehouse1981TV MoviePsmith
Shoestring1980TV SeriesDJ
Sunday Bloody Sunday1971Child Vandal (uncredited)

Music Department

Music Department

TitleYearStatusCharacter
The Ballad of Jack and Rose2005original score producer

Soundtrack

Soundtrack

TitleYearStatusCharacter
Nine2009performer: "Guido's Song", "I Can't Make This Movie"

Thanks

Thanks

TitleYearStatusCharacter
Maggie's Plan2015special thanks

Self

Self

TitleYearStatusCharacter
The 86th Annual Academy Awards2014TV SpecialHimself - Presenter: Best Actress in a Leading Role
The Journey to Lincoln2013Video documentary shortHimself
The Tonight Show with Jay Leno2013TV SeriesHimself - At the Vanity Fair Oscar Party
The 85th Annual Academy Awards2013TV SpecialHimself - Winner: Best Actor in a Leading Role
The Oscars Red Carpet Live2013TV MovieHimself - Interviewee
60 Minutes2013TV Series documentaryHimself - Actor (segment "Lincoln")
19th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards2013TV SpecialHimself - Presenter / Nominee
Lincoln: Sky Movies Special2013TV Movie documentaryHimself
Días de cine2013TV SeriesHimself
Los desayunos de TVE2013TV SeriesHimself - Guest
70th Golden Globe Awards2013TV SpecialHimself - Nominee
The Culture Show2013TV Series documentaryHimself
18th Annual Critics' Choice Movie Awards2013TV SpecialHimself
Lincoln: An American Journey2012TV MovieHimself
The BAFTA Britannia Awards2012TV SpecialHimself
AMC Lincoln Live Q & A2012TV MovieHimself
Irish Heritage Towns2012TV Movie documentaryHimself
Access to the Danger Zone2012Documentary voice
MSN Exclusives2012TV SeriesHimself (2013)
A Man's Story2010DocumentaryHimself
The Making of 'Last of the Mohicans'2010Video documentaryHimself
Le grand journal de Canal+2010TV Series documentaryHimself
Le petit journal2010TV SeriesHimself
Cinema 32010TV SeriesHimself
The 67th Annual Golden Globe Awards2010TV SpecialHimself - Nominee: Best Actor in a Motion Picture - Musical or Comedy
The Making of Anton AKA Trapped2009Video documentaryHimself
Entertainment Tonight2007-2009TV SeriesHimself
This Morning2009TV SeriesHimself - Guest
Larry King Live2009TV SeriesHimself - Guest
Live from Studio Five2009TV SeriesHimself
The Oprah Winfrey Show2008-2009TV SeriesHimself - Guest
Xposé2009TV SeriesHimself
Oscar's Red Carpet 2008 with Regis Philbin2008TV SpecialHimself
The 80th Annual Academy Awards2008TV SpecialHimself - Winner: Best Actor in a Leading Role
The Orange British Academy Film Awards2008TV Movie documentaryHimself
14th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards2008TV SpecialHimself - Winner: Best Male Actor in a Leading Role
Caiga quien caiga2008TV SeriesHimself
Golden Globes Announcement Special2008TV MovieHimself
13th Annual Critics' Choice Awards2008TV SpecialHimself
Charlie Rose1997-2007TV SeriesHimself - Guest
Parkinson2006TV SeriesHimself - Guest
Abby Singer2003Himself
The 100 Greatest Movie Stars2003TV Movie documentaryHimself
The 75th Annual Academy Awards2003TV SpecialHimself - Nominee: Best Actor in a Leading Role / Past Winner
The 2003 IFP Independent Spirit Awards2003TV Movie documentaryHimself
9th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards2003TV SpecialHimself
The Orange British Academy Film Awards2003TV SpecialHimself
The 60th Annual Golden Globe Awards2003TV SpecialHimself - Nominee: Best Actor in a Motion Picture Drama
Forever Ealing2002TV Movie documentaryNarrator (voice)
Uncovering the Real Gangs of New York2002TV Movie documentaryHimself
I Love 1980's2001TV Series documentaryHimself
Fighting for Peace: Inside 'The Boxer'1998Video documentary shortHimself
The 55th Annual Golden Globe Awards1998TV SpecialHimself - Nominee: Best Actor in a Motion Picture - Drama
Gomorron1995TV SeriesHimself
The 66th Annual Academy Awards1994TV SpecialHimself - Nominated: Best Actor in a Leading Role
The 51st Annual Golden Globe Awards1994TV SpecialHimself - Nominee: Best Actor in a Motion Picture - Drama
CBS This Morning1993TV SeriesHimself - Guest
The Making of 'In the Name of the Father'1993Documentary shortGerry Conlon
Innocence and Experience: The Making of 'The Age of Innocence'1992TV Movie documentaryHimself
The 63rd Annual Academy Awards1991TV SpecialHimself - Presenter: Best Actress in a Leading Role
Lunettes noires pour nuits blanches1990TV SeriesHimself
The 62nd Annual Academy Awards1990TV SpecialHimself - Winner: Best Actor in a Leading Role
The 47th Annual Golden Globe Awards1990TV SpecialHimself - Nominee: Best Actor in a Motion Picture - Drama
The Arsenio Hall Show1990TV SeriesHimself - Guest
Breakfast Time1986TV SeriesHimself

Archive Footage

Archive Footage

TitleYearStatusCharacter
Welcome to the Basement2012-2015TV SeriesAbraham Lincoln Daniel Plainview
And the Oscar Goes To...2014TV Movie documentaryHimself
60 Minutes2013TV Series documentaryHimself - Actor (segment "Lincoln")
Chelsea Lately2013TV SeriesHimself - Attendee, 'Golden Globe Awards'
Banda sonora2012TV SeriesNewland Archer
Edición Especial Coleccionista2011TV SeriesHawkeye (Nathaniel Poe)
Ceremonia de inauguración - 56º Festival internacional de cine de San Sebastián2008TV MovieDaniel Plainview (uncredited)
Strictly Courtroom2008TV Movie documentaryGerry Conlon (uncredited)
Shownieuws2008TV SeriesHimself
Oscar, que empiece el espectáculo2008TV Movie documentaryHimself / Daniel Plainview (uncredited)
Schau mir in die Augen, Kleiner2007DocumentaryJohnny (uncredited)
La Marató 20052005TV SpecialChristy Brown
Cinema mil2005TV SeriesHimself
Chain Reactions2005TV Mini-Series documentaryHimself
101 Biggest Celebrity Oops2004TV Special documentaryHimself
E! True Hollywood Story2002TV Series documentaryHimself
Twentieth Century Fox: The Blockbuster Years2000TV Movie documentaryHawkeye
Especial Oscars 861987TV MovieCecil Vyse

Won awards

Won awards

YearAwardCeremonyNominationMovieAward shared with
2016OFTA Film Hall of FameOnline Film & Television AssociationActing
2014Cinema Bloggers AwardCinema Bloggers Awards, PortugalBest Actor - International CompetitionLincoln (2012)
2014CCOPCríticos de Cinema Online Portugueses AwardsBest Actor (Melhor Actor)Lincoln (2012)
2013OscarAcademy Awards, USABest Performance by an Actor in a Leading RoleLincoln (2012)
2013Golden GlobeGolden Globes, USABest Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture - DramaLincoln (2012)
2013BAFTA Film AwardBAFTA AwardsBest Leading ActorLincoln (2012)
2013AACTA International AwardAACTA International AwardsBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2013EDA AwardAlliance of Women Film JournalistsBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2013Critics Choice AwardBroadcast Film Critics Association AwardsBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2013COFCA AwardCentral Ohio Film Critics AssociationBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2013DFCS AwardDenver Film Critics SocietyBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2013Dorian AwardGay and Lesbian Entertainment Critics Association (GALECA)Film Performance of the Year - ActorLincoln (2012)
2013GFCA AwardGeorgia Film Critics Association (GFCA)Best ActorLincoln (2012)
2013Gold Derby AwardGold Derby AwardsLead ActorLincoln (2012)
2013IFC AwardIowa Film Critics AwardsBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2013IFTA AwardIrish Film and Television AwardsBest International ActorLincoln (2012)
2013NSFC AwardNational Society of Film Critics Awards, USABest ActorLincoln (2012)
2013NTFCA AwardNorth Texas Film Critics Association, USBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2013OFTA Film AwardOnline Film & Television AssociationBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2013OFCS AwardOnline Film Critics Society AwardsBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2013Montecito AwardSanta Barbara International Film Festival
2013ActorScreen Actors Guild AwardsOutstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading RoleLincoln (2012)
2012ACCAAwards Circuit Community AwardsBest Actor in a Leading RoleLincoln (2012)
2012Britannia AwardBAFTA/LA Britannia AwardsStanley Kubrick Britannia Award for Excellence in Film
2012BFCC AwardBlack Film Critics Circle AwardsBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2012BFCC AwardBlack Film Critics Circle AwardsBest EnsembleLincoln (2012)· Sally Field
· Joseph Gordon-Levitt
· Hal Holbrook
· Tommy Lee Jones
· James Spader
· David Strathairn
2012BOFCA AwardBoston Online Film Critics AssociationBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2012BSFC AwardBoston Society of Film Critics AwardsBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2012CFCA AwardChicago Film Critics Association AwardsBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2012DFWFCA AwardDallas-Fort Worth Film Critics Association AwardsBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2012DFCS AwardDetroit Film Critic Society, USBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2012FFCC AwardFlorida Film Critics Circle AwardsBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2012Golden SchmoesGolden Schmoes AwardsBest Actor of the YearLincoln (2012)
2012HFCS AwardHouston Film Critics Society AwardsBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2012IGN AwardIGN Summer Movie AwardsBest Movie ActorLincoln (2012)
2012IFJA AwardIndiana Film Journalists Association, USBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2012KCFCC AwardKansas City Film Critics Circle AwardsBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2012Sierra AwardLas Vegas Film Critics Society AwardsBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2012NFCS AwardNevada Film Critics SocietyBest Ensemble CastLincoln (2012)· Sally Field
· Joseph Gordon-Levitt
· Hal Holbrook
· Tommy Lee Jones
· James Spader
· David Strathairn
2012NYFCC AwardNew York Film Critics Circle AwardsBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2012NYFCO AwardNew York Film Critics, OnlineBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2012OFCC AwardOklahoma Film Critics Circle AwardsBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2012PFCS AwardPhoenix Film Critics Society AwardsBest Actor in a Leading RoleLincoln (2012)
2012SDFCS AwardSan Diego Film Critics Society AwardsBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2012SEFCA AwardSoutheastern Film Critics Association AwardsBest EnsembleLincoln (2012)· Sally Field
· Tommy Lee Jones
· Joseph Gordon-Levitt
· David Strathairn
· Hal Holbrook
· James Spader
2012SEFCA AwardSoutheastern Film Critics Association AwardsBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2012SLFCA AwardSt. Louis Film Critics Association, USBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2012WAFCA AwardWashington DC Area Film Critics Association AwardsBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2012WFCC AwardWomen Film Critics Circle AwardsBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2010Gold Derby AwardGold Derby AwardsLead Actor of the DecadeThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2009Richard Harris AwardBritish Independent Film Awards
2009IOFCP AwardInternational Online Film Critics' PollBest Actor in a Leading RoleThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2009Special Achievement AwardSatellite AwardsBest Ensemble, Motion PictureNine (2009)· Kate Hudson
· Fergie
· Penélope Cruz
· Marion Cotillard
· Nicole Kidman
· Judi Dench
· Sophia Loren
2008OscarAcademy Awards, USABest Performance by an Actor in a Leading RoleThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2008Golden GlobeGolden Globes, USABest Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture - DramaThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2008BAFTA Film AwardBAFTA AwardsBest Leading ActorThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2008Critics Choice AwardBroadcast Film Critics Association AwardsBest ActorThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2008COFCA AwardCentral Ohio Film Critics AssociationBest ActorThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2008Chlotrudis AwardChlotrudis AwardsBest ActorThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2008Career Achievement AwardDublin International Film Festival
2008Evening Standard British Film AwardEvening Standard British Film AwardsBest ActorThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2008Gold Derby AwardGold Derby AwardsLead ActorThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2008HFCS AwardHouston Film Critics Society AwardsBest ActorThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2008INOCAInternational Online Cinema Awards (INOCA)Best ActorThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2008IFTA AwardIrish Film and Television AwardsBest International ActorThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2008IOMAItalian Online Movie Awards (IOMA)Best Actor (Miglior attore protagonista)There Will Be Blood (2007)
2008ALFS AwardLondon Critics Circle Film AwardsActor of the YearThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2008NSFC AwardNational Society of Film Critics Awards, USABest ActorThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2008NTFCA AwardNorth Texas Film Critics Association, USBest ActorThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2008OFTA Film AwardOnline Film & Television AssociationBest ActorThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2008OFCS AwardOnline Film Critics Society AwardsBest ActorThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2008Desert Palm Achievement AwardPalm Springs International Film FestivalThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2008ActorScreen Actors Guild AwardsOutstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading RoleThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2008VFCC AwardVancouver Film Critics CircleBest ActorThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2007EDA AwardAlliance of Women Film JournalistsBest ActorThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2007Austin Film Critics AwardAustin Film Critics AssociationBest ActorThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2007ACCAAwards Circuit Community AwardsBest Actor in a Leading RoleThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2007CFCA AwardChicago Film Critics Association AwardsBest ActorThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2007DFWFCA AwardDallas-Fort Worth Film Critics Association AwardsBest ActorThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2007FFCC AwardFlorida Film Critics Circle AwardsBest ActorThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2007Golden SchmoesGolden Schmoes AwardsBest Actor of the YearThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2007ICP AwardIndiewire Critics' PollBest Lead PerformanceThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2007KCFCC AwardKansas City Film Critics Circle AwardsBest ActorThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2007Sierra AwardLas Vegas Film Critics Society AwardsBest ActorThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2007LAFCA AwardLos Angeles Film Critics Association AwardsBest ActorThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2007NYFCC AwardNew York Film Critics Circle AwardsBest ActorThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2007NYFCO AwardNew York Film Critics, OnlineBest ActorThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2007PFCS AwardPhoenix Film Critics Society AwardsBest Performance by an Actor in a Leading RoleThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2007SDFCS AwardSan Diego Film Critics Society AwardsBest ActorThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2007SEFCA AwardSoutheastern Film Critics Association AwardsBest ActorThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2007SLFCA AwardSt. Louis Film Critics Association, USBest ActorThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2007Silver Medallion AwardTelluride Film Festival, US
2007UFCA AwardUtah Film Critics Association AwardsBest ActorThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2007VVFP AwardVillage Voice Film PollBest ActorThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2007WFCC AwardWomen Film Critics Circle AwardsBest ActorThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2005Berlinale CameraBerlin International Film Festival
2005Best ActorMarrakech International Film FestivalThe Ballad of Jack and Rose (2005)
2003BAFTA Film AwardBAFTA AwardsBest Performance by an Actor in a Leading RoleGangs of New York (2002)
2003Critics Choice AwardBroadcast Film Critics Association AwardsBest ActorGangs of New York (2002)
2003COFCA AwardCentral Ohio Film Critics AssociationBest ActorGangs of New York (2002)
2003CFCA AwardChicago Film Critics Association AwardsBest ActorGangs of New York (2002)
2003FFCC AwardFlorida Film Critics Circle AwardsBest ActorGangs of New York (2002)
2003Gold Derby AwardGold Derby AwardsLead ActorGangs of New York (2002)
2003IOMAItalian Online Movie Awards (IOMA)Best Actor (Miglior attore protagonista)Gangs of New York (2002)
2003OFTA Film AwardOnline Film & Television AssociationBest ActorGangs of New York (2002)
2003OFCS AwardOnline Film Critics Society AwardsBest ActorGangs of New York (2002)
2003Golden AriesRussian Guild of Film CriticsBest Foreign ActorGangs of New York (2002)
2003Golden Satellite AwardSatellite AwardsBest Actor in a Motion Picture, DramaGangs of New York (2002)
2003ActorScreen Actors Guild AwardsOutstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading RoleGangs of New York (2002)
2003VFCC AwardVancouver Film Critics CircleBest ActorGangs of New York (2002)
2002ACCAAwards Circuit Community AwardsBest Actor in a Leading RoleGangs of New York (2002)
2002Golden SchmoesGolden Schmoes AwardsBest Actor of the YearGangs of New York (2002)
2002KCFCC AwardKansas City Film Critics Circle AwardsBest ActorGangs of New York (2002)
2002Sierra AwardLas Vegas Film Critics Society AwardsBest ActorGangs of New York (2002)
2002LAFCA AwardLos Angeles Film Critics Association AwardsBest ActorGangs of New York (2002)
2002NYFCC AwardNew York Film Critics Circle AwardsBest ActorGangs of New York (2002)
2002NYFCO AwardNew York Film Critics, OnlineBest ActorGangs of New York (2002)
2002SDFCS AwardSan Diego Film Critics Society AwardsBest ActorGangs of New York (2002)
2002Seattle Film Critics AwardSeattle Film Critics AwardsBest ActorGangs of New York (2002)
2002SEFCA AwardSoutheastern Film Critics Association AwardsBest ActorGangs of New York (2002)
2002UFCA AwardUtah Film Critics Association AwardsBest ActorGangs of New York (2002)
1993BSFC AwardBoston Society of Film Critics AwardsBest ActorIn the Name of the Father (1993)
1993Evening Standard British Film AwardEvening Standard British Film AwardsBest ActorThe Last of the Mohicans (1992)
1993ALFS AwardLondon Critics Circle Film AwardsBritish Actor of the YearThe Last of the Mohicans (1992)
1990OscarAcademy Awards, USABest Actor in a Leading RoleMy Left Foot: The Story of Christy Brown (1989)
1990BAFTA Film AwardBAFTA AwardsBest ActorMy Left Foot: The Story of Christy Brown (1989)
1990BSFC AwardBoston Society of Film Critics AwardsBest ActorMy Left Foot: The Story of Christy Brown (1989)
1990Evening Standard British Film AwardEvening Standard British Film AwardsBest ActorMy Left Foot: The Story of Christy Brown (1989)
1990ALFS AwardLondon Critics Circle Film AwardsActor of the YearMy Left Foot: The Story of Christy Brown (1989)
1990NSFC AwardNational Society of Film Critics Awards, USABest ActorMy Left Foot: The Story of Christy Brown (1989)
1989BSFC AwardBoston Society of Film Critics AwardsBest ActorThe Unbearable Lightness of Being (1988)
1989LAFCA AwardLos Angeles Film Critics Association AwardsBest ActorMy Left Foot: The Story of Christy Brown (1989)
1989Best ActorMontréal World Film FestivalMy Left Foot: The Story of Christy Brown (1989)
1989Prize of the Ecumenical Jury - Special MentionMontréal World Film FestivalMy Left Foot: The Story of Christy Brown (1989)· Jim Sheridan (director)
1989NYFCC AwardNew York Film Critics Circle AwardsBest ActorMy Left Foot: The Story of Christy Brown (1989)
1986NBR AwardNational Board of Review, USABest Supporting ActorA Room with a View (1985)
1986NYFCC AwardNew York Film Critics Circle AwardsBest Supporting ActorMy Beautiful Laundrette (1985)

Nominated awards

Nominated awards

YearAwardCeremonyNominationMovieAward shared with
2013Movies for Grownups AwardAARP Movies for Grownups AwardsBest Grownup Love StoryLincoln (2012)· Sally Field
2013Movies for Grownups AwardAARP Movies for Grownups AwardsBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2013DFCCDublin Film Critics Circle AwardsBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2013Empire AwardEmpire Awards, UKBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2013Evening Standard British Film AwardEvening Standard British Film AwardsBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2013Gold Derby AwardGold Derby AwardsEnsemble CastLincoln (2012)· Joseph Cross
· Sally Field
· Joseph Gordon-Levitt
· Jackie Earle Haley
· Jared Harris
· John Hawkes
· Hal Holbrook
· Tommy Lee Jones
· Bruce McGill
· Gulliver McGrath
· Tim Blake Nelson
· David Oyelowo
· Lee Pace
· Gloria Reuben
· James Spader
· David Strathairn
· Michael Stuhlbarg
2013ICS AwardInternational Cinephile Society AwardsBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2013INOCAInternational Online Cinema Awards (INOCA)Best ActorLincoln (2012)
2013IOMAItalian Online Movie Awards (IOMA)Best Actor (Miglior attore protagonista)Lincoln (2012)
2013ALFS AwardLondon Critics Circle Film AwardsActor of the YearLincoln (2012)
2013ALFS AwardLondon Critics Circle Film AwardsBritish Actor of the YearLincoln (2012)
2013MTV Movie AwardMTV Movie AwardsBest Male PerformanceLincoln (2012)
2013NCFCA AwardNorth Carolina Film Critics AssociationBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2013ActorScreen Actors Guild AwardsOutstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion PictureLincoln (2012)· Sally Field
· Joseph Gordon-Levitt
· Hal Holbrook
· Tommy Lee Jones
· James Spader
· David Strathairn
2013VFCC AwardVancouver Film Critics CircleBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2012ACCAAwards Circuit Community AwardsBest Cast EnsembleLincoln (2012)· Tommy Lee Jones
· Sally Field
· David Strathairn
· John Hawkes
· Lee Pace
· Joseph Gordon-Levitt
· Hal Holbrook
· Joseph Cross
· James Spader
· Jackie Earle Haley
2012IOFCP AwardInternational Online Film Critics' PollBest Actor in a Leading RoleLincoln (2012)
2012Satellite AwardSatellite AwardsBest Actor in a Motion PictureLincoln (2012)
2012TFCA AwardToronto Film Critics Association AwardsBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2010Golden GlobeGolden Globes, USABest Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture - Comedy or MusicalNine (2009)
2010Movies for Grownups AwardAARP Movies for Grownups AwardsBest ActorNine (2009)
2010Gold Derby AwardGold Derby AwardsPerformer of the Decade
2010IOFCP AwardInternational Online Film Critics' PollBest Actor of the DecadeThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2010ActorScreen Actors Guild AwardsOutstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion PictureNine (2009)· Marion Cotillard
· Penélope Cruz
· Judi Dench
· Fergie
· Kate Hudson
· Nicole Kidman
· Sophia Loren
2009Empire AwardEmpire Awards, UKBest ActorThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2009Satellite AwardSatellite AwardsBest Actor in a Motion Picture, Comedy or MusicalNine (2009)
2009WAFCA AwardWashington DC Area Film Critics Association AwardsBest EnsembleNine (2009)· Marion Cotillard
· Penélope Cruz
· Judi Dench
· Fergie
· Kate Hudson
· Nicole Kidman
· Sophia Loren
2008Saturn AwardAcademy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films, USABest ActorThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2007DFCS AwardDetroit Film Critic Society, USBest ActorThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2004Empire AwardEmpire Awards, UKBest ActorGangs of New York (2002)
2003OscarAcademy Awards, USABest Actor in a Leading RoleGangs of New York (2002)
2003Golden GlobeGolden Globes, USABest Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture - DramaGangs of New York (2002)
2003MTV Movie AwardMTV Movie AwardsBest VillainGangs of New York (2002)
2003PFCS AwardPhoenix Film Critics Society AwardsBest Actor in a Leading RoleGangs of New York (2002)
2002ACCAAwards Circuit Community AwardsBest Cast EnsembleGangs of New York (2002)· Leonardo DiCaprio
· John C. Reilly
· Cameron Diaz
· Liam Neeson
· Henry Thomas
· Brendan Gleeson
· Jim Broadbent
· Gary Lewis
· Eddie Marsan
2002TFCA AwardToronto Film Critics Association AwardsBest Performance, MaleGangs of New York (2002)
2002WAFCA AwardWashington DC Area Film Critics Association AwardsBest ActorGangs of New York (2002)
1998Golden GlobeGolden Globes, USABest Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture - DramaThe Boxer (1997)
1996ACCAAwards Circuit Community AwardsBest Cast EnsembleThe Crucible (1996)· Winona Ryder
· Joan Allen
· Paul Scofield
· Bruce Davison
· Rob Campbell
· Jeffrey Jones
· Frances Conroy
· Charlayne Woodard
1994OscarAcademy Awards, USABest Actor in a Leading RoleIn the Name of the Father (1993)
1994Golden GlobeGolden Globes, USABest Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture - DramaIn the Name of the Father (1993)
1994BAFTA Film AwardBAFTA AwardsBest ActorIn the Name of the Father (1993)
1994CFCA AwardChicago Film Critics Association AwardsBest ActorThe Age of Innocence (1993)
1994DavidDavid di Donatello AwardsBest Foreign Actor (Migliore Attore Straniero)In the Name of the Father (1993)
1993BAFTA Film AwardBAFTA AwardsBest ActorThe Last of the Mohicans (1992)
1990Golden GlobeGolden Globes, USABest Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture - DramaMy Left Foot: The Story of Christy Brown (1989)
1990CFCA AwardChicago Film Critics Association AwardsBest ActorMy Left Foot: The Story of Christy Brown (1989)
1989European Film AwardEuropean Film AwardsEuropean Actor of the YearMy Left Foot: The Story of Christy Brown (1989)

2nd place awards

2nd place awards

YearAwardCeremonyNominationMovieAward shared with
2013COFCA AwardCentral Ohio Film Critics AssociationBest EnsembleLincoln (2012)· Michael Stuhlbarg
· James Spader
· Sally Field
· Joseph Gordon-Levitt
· Tim Blake Nelson
· Jackie Earle Haley
· Tommy Lee Jones
· David Strathairn
· Hal Holbrook
2012UFCA AwardUtah Film Critics Association AwardsBest ActorLincoln (2012)
2008ICS AwardInternational Cinephile Society AwardsBest ActorThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2007BSFC AwardBoston Society of Film Critics AwardsBest ActorThere Will Be Blood (2007)
2003DFWFCA AwardDallas-Fort Worth Film Critics Association AwardsBest ActorGangs of New York (2002)
2002BSFC AwardBoston Society of Film Critics AwardsBest ActorGangs of New York (2002)
2002Golden SchmoesGolden Schmoes AwardsCoolest Character of the YearGangs of New York (2002)
2002VVFP AwardVillage Voice Film PollBest PerformanceGangs of New York (2002)
1996NYFCC AwardNew York Film Critics Circle AwardsBest ActorThe Crucible (1996)
1994NSFC AwardNational Society of Film Critics Awards, USABest ActorIn the Name of the Father (1993)
1993LAFCA AwardLos Angeles Film Critics Association AwardsBest ActorThe Age of Innocence (1993)
1987NSFC AwardNational Society of Film Critics Awards, USABest Supporting ActorMy Beautiful Laundrette (1985)

3rd place awards

3rd place awards

YearAwardCeremonyNominationMovieAward shared with
2012ICP AwardIndiewire Critics' PollBest Lead PerformanceLincoln (2012)
2012VVFP AwardVillage Voice Film PollBest ActorLincoln (2012)
1993NYFCC AwardNew York Film Critics Circle AwardsBest ActorThe Age of Innocence (1993)

TitleSalary
The Crucible (1996)$8,000,000

#Fact
1His Oscar for Lincoln (2012) makes he and Raymond Massey the eighth pair of male actors to be nominated for playing the same part (Massey for Abe Lincoln in Illinois (1940), and he is the only actor to win when his predecessor had lost. Charles Laughton and Richard Burton were both nominated for playing King Henry VIII (Burton for Anne of the Thousand Days (1969), Laughton for The Private Life of Henry VIII. (1933)), for which Laughton won. Robert Donat and Peter O'Toole were both nominated for playing Mr. Chips (Donat in Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1939), O'Toole for Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1969)), which Donat won. John Wayne and Jeff Bridges were both nominated for playing Rooster Cogburn (Wayne in True Grit (1969), Bridges in True Grit (2010), which Wayne won. Marlon Brando and Robert De Niro both won for playing Vito Corleone (Brando in The Godfather (1972), De Niro for The Godfather: Part II (1974)). José Ferrer and Gérard Depardieu were both nominated for playing Cyrano de Bergerac (Ferrer for Cyrano de Bergerac (1950), Depardieu for Cyrano de Bergerac (1990)), and Ferrer won. Anthony Hopkins and Frank Langella were both nominated for playing Richard Nixon (Hopkins in Nixon (1995), Langella for Frost/Nixon (2008)); both lost. Jason Robards and Leonardo DiCaprio were both nominated for playing Howard Hughes (Robards for Melvin and Howard (1980), DeCaprio for The Aviator (2004)); both lost.
2He was awarded Knight Bachelor of the Order of the British Empire in the 2014 Queen's Birthday Honours List for his services to Drama.
3He is not only the first actor to win 3 Best Actor Oscars, but the only British Actor to win at least 2 Best Actor Oscars.
4As of 2014, has appeared in seven films that were nominated for the Best Picture Oscar: Gandhi (1982), A Room with a View (1985), My Left Foot (1989), In the Name of the Father (1993), Gangs of New York (2002), There Will Be Blood (2007) and Lincoln (2012). Gandhi (1982) won in the category.
5In Gangs of New York (2002) his character "The Butcher" throws a knife at a picture of President Abraham Lincoln, hitting him right between the eyes. Ten years later he starred in Steven Spielberg's Lincoln (2012), playing the president himself.
6Became a father for the 3rd time at age 45 when his wife Rebecca Miller gave birth to their son Cashel Blake Day-Lewis in May 2002.
7Became a father for the 2nd time at age 41 when his wife Rebecca Miller gave birth to their son Ronan Cal Day-Lewis on June 14, 1998.
8Became a father for the 1st time at age 37 when his ex-girlfriend Isabelle Adjani gave birth to their son Gabriel-Kane Day Lewis on April 9, 1995.
9In 2013 he used the international premiere of his film Lincoln (2012) in Ireland as a fundraiser for the Wicklow Hospice Foundation.
10He partook in the 2013 Millie Miglia driving a 1953 Jaguar XK 120. His co-driver was James Gianopulos, the Chairman and CEO of Fox Filmed Entertainment.
11In May 2013 he received an honorary degree from the Julliard School.
12One of Time Magazine's 100 Most Influential People in the World. [2013]
13On March 19, 2013, a two-DVD set entitled "Daniel Day-Lewis Triple Feature", a compilation of much of the actor's performances on British TV programs from 1982 to 1986, was released in the U.S. by BBC Home Entertainment.
14He is the first actor to win an Oscar for playing a U.S. President, and the first to win for playing Abraham Lincoln. Only one other actor, Raymond Massey, has been Oscar-nominated for playing the role; despite turning in a critically acclaimed performance as Lincoln in Young Mr. Lincoln (1939), Henry Fonda was not nominated for his performance.
15Dedicated his 2013 Best Actor Oscar to his late mother, actress Jill Balcon.
16Is one of 5 actors to have won the Academy Award 3 times in their career; the others in chronological order are Walter Brennan, Ingrid Bergman, Jack Nicholson and Meryl Streep. These actors have only been surpassed by Katharine Hepburn, who won the Academy Award 4 times during her career.
17Is the second actor to have received a Best Actor Oscar nomination for portraying Abraham Lincoln; the other is Raymond Massey in Abe Lincoln in Illinois (1940).
18The longest he has gone without an Oscar nomination is 9 years, between In the Name of the Father (1993) and Gangs of New York (2002).
19He first became interested in acting when he learned to replicate the accent and mannerisms of people in his neighborhood to avoid standing out to bullies.
20His father was of Northern Irish and English descent. His mother was from a Jewish family that emigrated to the U.K. from Poland and Latvia.
21He originally decided to become a cabinet maker but was not accepted for an apprenticeship.
22Turned down the lead role in a film based on mass murderer Dennis Nilsen.
23Turned down the role of "Simon Templar" in The Saint (1997).
24Turned down the lead role in The English Patient (1996).
25Sir John Gielgud said that "he had what every actor in Hollywood wants: talent. And what every actor in England wants: looks".
26Turned down a role in Cutthroat Island (1995).
27Turned down the lead role in Mary Reilly (1996).
28Zack Snyder offered him the role of "Jor-El" in Superman: Man of Steel (2013).
29Turned down a role in Terminator Salvation (2009).
30His performance as "Daniel Plainview" in There Will Be Blood (2007) was listed as third in TotalFilm's "150 Greatest Movie Performances of All Time" (Dec 2009).
31Son-in-law of photographer Inge Morath and playwright Arthur Miller.
32Was offered the role of Aragorn in the Lord of the Rings trilogy (2001-2003) but declined.
33Is one of 11 actors to have won the Academy Award, BAFTA Award, Critics' Choice Award, Golden Globe Award and SAG Award for the same performance (There Will Be Blood (2007) and Lincoln (2012)). The others in chronological order are Geoffrey Rush for Shine (1996), Jamie Foxx for Ray (2004), Philip Seymour Hoffman for Capote (2005), Forest Whitaker for The Last King of Scotland (2006), Javier Bardem for No Country for Old Men (2007), Heath Ledger for The Dark Knight (2008), Christoph Waltz for Inglourious Basterds (2009), Colin Firth for The King's Speech (2010), Christopher Plummer for Beginners (2010), and J.K. Simmons for Whiplash (2014).
34My Beautiful Laundrette (1985) and A Room with a View (1985) both opened in New York on the same day--March 7, 1986. Both featured him in prominent and very different roles: in "A Room with a View" he played a repressed, snobbish Edwardian upperclassman, while in "My Beautiful Laundrette" he played a lower-class, gay ex-skinhead in love with an ambitious Pakistani businessman in Margaret Thatcher's London. When American critics saw him--he was then virtually unknown in the US--in two such different roles on the same day, many (including Roger Ebert of The Chicago Sun-Times and Vincent Canby of The New York Times) raved about the talent it must have taken him to play such vastly different characters.
35He won 23 acting awards for his performance in There Will Be Blood (2007), including the coveted Oscar.
36Dedicated his 2008 Oscar to his grandfather, film studio boss Michael Balcon, his poet father Nicholas Blake (aka Cecil Day-Lewis), and his three sons Gabriel-Kane Day Lewis (born on 9 April 1995), Ronan Cal Day-Lewis (born on 14 June 1998) and Cashel Blake Day-Lewis (born in May 2002).
37The first non-American actor to win three Academy Awards for Best Actor. He is also the first actor anywhere to win three Oscars in that category--2013's Oscar for Lincoln (2012) was his third.
38Got to know his future wife Rebecca Miller while working on The Crucible (1996), the film version of her father Arthur Miller's play.
39Owns homes in the US and Ireland.
40Trained at the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School where colleagues included Miranda Richardson and Greta Scacchi.
41Supports Millwall Football Club.
42Was director Alex Cox's second choice for the role of Sid Vicious in Sid and Nancy (1986). Gary Oldman got the part.
43Holds dual citizenship - British and Irish.
44Dedicated his 2008 SAG Award to Heath Ledger, who was one of his favorite actors.
45During The Last of the Mohicans (1992) he built a canoe, learned to track and skin animals, and perfected the use of a 12-pound flintlock gun, which he took everywhere he went, even to a Christmas dinner.
46Late in the run of the 1989 production of "Hamlet" at the National Theatre in London, he reported that he had a strange sensation that he was talking to his father, who died of pancreatic cancer when Daniel was 15. Unnerved, he walked off the stage and never returned. He still doesn't like to talk about it.
47While filming The Ballad of Jack and Rose (2005) on Prince Edward Island, Canada, he lived alone in a hut on the beach, away from his wife, director Rebecca Miller, and their children.
48Turned down leading role of Steven Soderbergh film Solaris (2002). The role instead went to George Clooney.
49Appears in the novel "That Must Be Yoshino".
50Born to Nicholas Blake (aka Cecil Day-Lewis) and his second wife Jill Balcon, he lost his father at the age of 15.
51Grandson of Michael Balcon.
52His performance as Bill "The Butcher" Cutting in Gangs of New York (2002) is ranked #53 on Premiere Magazine's 100 Greatest Performances of All Time (2006).
53His performance as Christy Brown in My Left Foot (1989) is ranked #11 on Premiere Magazine's 100 Greatest Performances of All Time (2006).
54While filming Gangs of New York (2002) he rarely got out of character and would talk with a New York accent the whole day and would be sharpening his knives at lunch.
55Hated being at Sevenoaks School so much that he ran away.
56After Michael Madsen was found to be unavailable for the part, Day-Lewis tried to get the role of Vincent Vega in Pulp Fiction (1994), one of the few times he actively pursued a part. However, by that point in the casting, Quentin Tarantino had John Travolta in mind for the part.
57Considered doing an adaptation of "Rose and the Snake" in the early 1990s, but the project fell through. After marrying Rebecca Miller, she convinced him to take the lead role and directed him in the adaptation The Ballad of Jack and Rose (2005).
58Frequently called the "English Robert De Niro." He recently referred to De Niro as his champion.
59Was considered for the role of Jesus Christ in The Passion of the Christ (2004), but director Mel Gibson thought he looked "too European" and the part instead went to Jim Caviezel.
60In The Crucible (1996) Joan Allen plays his wife. In The Boxer (1997) Emily Watson plays his wife. Both have played Reba McLain. Allen played the part in Manhunter (1986), Watson played the part in the remake, Red Dragon (2002).
61He was the first of three consecutive British actors to win the Oscar for Best Actor in a leading role, Jeremy Irons being next and Anthony Hopkins the third. Each of them coincidentally won at their first nomination in the Academy Awards.
62Always quiet and introverted, he said that he was not popular in school and was mocked as an outsider while growing up in England, partially because he was of half-Jewish/half-Irish stock. The upside was that, instead of socializing, he developed a rich fantasy life that later helped him to delve so deeply into his characters.
63He was Jonathan Demme's first choice for the part of Andrew Beckett in Philadelphia (1993). He turned the part down to work on In the Name of the Father (1993) and Tom Hanks was cast in Philadelphia (1993) instead. He earned an Oscar nomination for best actor in In the Name of the Father (1993), but Hanks won the Best Actor Oscar for Philadelphia (1993).
64He listened to Eminem to get into an angry, self-righteous frame of mind as Bill the Butcher while shooting Gangs of New York (2002).
65Is a skilled woodworker in addition to being able to make his living as a cobbler.
66Chosen by People magazine as one of the "50 Most Beautiful People" in the world. [2003]
67Announced that he will star in Rose and the Snake, co-written and directed by his wife, Rebecca Miller. The film was later renamed The Ballad of Jack and Rose (2005). [February 2003]
68According to Gangs of New York (2002) co-star John C. Reilly, he got sick during shooting in Italy, refusing to trade his character's threadbare coat for a warmer coat because the warmer coat did not exist in the 19th century; doctors finally forced him to take antibiotics.
69Describes himself as "a lifelong study of evasion."
70According to Harvey Weinstein, Day-Lewis was taking time off to work as a cobbler in Florence, Italy when Weinstein, director Martin Scorsese and star Leonardo DiCaprio lured him into coming back to New York "on false pretenses" so they could persuade him to accept lead role in Gangs of New York (2002).
71Son-in-law of playwright Arthur Miller.
72Several times offered and turned down the role of Aragorn (Strider) in Peter Jackson's The Lord of the Rings film trilogy.
73Chosen by Empire magazine as one of the "100 Sexiest Stars" in film history (#11). [1995]
74Chosen by People magazine as one of the "50 Most Beautiful People" in the world. [1990]
75Younger brother of Tamasin Day-Lewis.
76Was in a relationship with Isabelle Adjani from 1989 to 1994; they had one son together.
77Moving to County Wicklow, Ireland, he assumed Irish citizenship. [1993]
78Ranked #25 in Empire (UK) magazine's "The Top 100 Movie Stars of All Time" list. [October 1997]

#Quote
1[in a 1987 interview about the variety of his roles] I don't set out in search of something that is different, although I probably do go in search of things that involve traveling a certain distance away from my own life and away from the lives of characters I've already explored. But at the end of a job, there's always a sense of having failed to some extent in the exploration - of knowing that there are many, many other factors that might have been explored. Yet at the same time, I always feel it's time to move on, regardless of any dissatisfaction.
2There's no point in making social comments badly. That is really dangerous... I don't like things that just gripe.
3[on stage vs. film acting in a 1987 interview] I'm greedy. I prefer both. By that I mean I feel that I'd be missing out if I were to do only one or the other.
4"I know as an Englishman, it's absolutely none of my business, but I'm so very grateful it was you." [On Barack Obama's re-election, November 2012]
5I miss playing [Abraham Lincoln]. Very much. I miss the proximity to his character. There was a time in my life when it wasn't clear whether or not I would amount to anything. I was fearful about my future. In England, people were hell-bent on certifying me--to them, the way I work as an actor is the system of someone who is unhinged. As a young man, when I saw the early movies by Martin Scorsese, I saw a way to be, a kind of liberation. In those movies, America seemed like a place of infinite opportunities. In Lincoln (2012), we tried to show that sense of grand democratic possibility. We created a world I didn't want to leave.
6Since we got married 16 years ago, my wife [Rebecca Miller] has lived with some very strange men. But luckily, she's the versatile one in the family and she's been the perfect companion to all of them.
7[on being presented the 2013 Best Actor Oscar by Meryl Streep] It's strange because three years ago, before we decided to do a straight swap, I had actually been committed to play Margaret Thatcher and Meryl was Steven Spielberg's first choice for Lincoln (2012). I'd have liked to see that version.
8[accepting the Best Actor award at SAG, 2013] It occurred to me--it was an actor that murdered Abraham Lincoln. And therefore, somehow it is only so fitting that every now and then an actor tries to bring him back to life again.
9I never, ever felt that depth of love for another human being that I never met. And that's, I think, probably the effect that [Abraham Lincoln] has on most people that take the time to discover him . . . I wish he had stayed [with me] forever.
10[on photos of Abraham Lincoln by Alexander Gardner] I looked at them the way you sometimes look at your own reflection in a mirror and wonder who that person is looking back at you.
11[on playing Abraham Lincoln] I thought this is a very, very bad idea. But by that time it was too late. I had already been drawn into Lincoln's orbit. He has a very powerful orbit, which is interesting because we tend to hold him at such a distance. He's been mythologized almost to the point of dehumanization. But when you begin to approach him, he almost instantly becomes welcoming and accessible, the way he was in life.
12I'm woefully one-track-minded. Without sounding unhinged, I know I'm not Abraham Lincoln. I'm aware of that. But the truth is the entire game is about creating an illusion, and for whatever reason, and mad as it may sound, some part of me can allow myself to believe for a period for time without questioning, and that's the trick. Maybe it's a terrible revelation about myself that one does feel able to do that.
13[on events in America, 2012] I think a lot about what President [Barack Obama] is going through at this moment. I look to the extent to which he has aged visibly. I feel I aged visibly just playing [President Abraham Lincoln], so to actually have that responsibility is a burden that one can only explore in one's imagination. Anyone who has that position of authority must necessarily find themselves very, very alone at certain times. I'm not in any way comparing his work to the work that I do as an actor, but it's a common theme.
14[on the United States] I probably do have a greater fascination for the history of this country than I do for my own. I date that back to the moment that Michael Mann invited me to do The Last of the Mohicans (1992)]. I hedged my bets for a long time because I thought, "Why? Why would he want to do that?". Eventually I thought, "Well, if he's willing to take that chance, who am I to say no?".
15I became conflicted in my late teens. I imagined an alternative life as a furniture maker. For about a year I just didn't know what to do. I did laboring jobs-- working in the docks, construction sites. When I did make the decision to focus on acting, I think my mother was just relieved for me that I had finally started to focus. She probably feared for me much more than she ever let on, because all I got from her, no matter what I was doing was encouragement--so much so that I think I became quite a harsh judge of myself to try to restore some kind of balance.
16[on playing Abraham Lincoln] The minute you begin to approach him--and there are vast corridors that have been carved that lead you to an understanding of that man's life, both through the great riches of his own writing and all the contemporary accounts and biographies--he feels immediately and surprisingly accessible. He draws you closer to him.
17I like to take a long time over things, and I believe that it's the time spent away from the work that allows me to do the work itself. If you're lurching from from one film set or one theater to the other, I'm not sure what your resources would be as a human being.
18Interviews are God's great joke on me.
19[on the rumors surrounding his acting process]: Certainly in England I think they prefer to believe that I'm stone mad. That's how they account for all my eccentric behavior. But I always feel as if that has been largely misrepresented, the details that have been singled out...People are fascinated by the peripheral details. But that's not where the principal work takes place, obviously. That takes place either inside you, or it doesn't happen at all. It's your own life that breathes itself into and through the character. But people prefer to dwell on the stuff that appears on the face of it to be some form of self-flagellation. And for me, everything is part of the joy of discovering this life - that one is trying to inform as well as satisfying an irresistible curiosity. So it's the pleasure in learning that has always been the prevailing feeling for me. And yet consistently it's represented as this tortured thing.
20[on the passing of Pete Postlethwaite] "Pos" was the one. As students, it was him we went to see on stage time and time again. It was him we wanted to be like: wild and true, lion-hearted, unselfconscious, irreverent. He was on our side. He watched out for us. We loved him and followed him like happy children, never a breath away from laughter. He shouldn't have gone. I wish so much that he hadn't. There's a tendency to make lists at this time of the year. When we get to the Best of British, if Pete isn't at the top of that list, he shouldn't be far from it.
21[About Heath Ledger] As much as I was glad to have a chance to say something in that moment. There was plenty more I could say but we're not just fueling a fire that's already out of control. His family, for instance, at this moment are trying to suffer that unimaginable grief in the full scrutiny of a fucking circus and anything that I say is probably going to contribute even more to that and keep the story running and running and running. There will come a time eventually when people just remember that he was a beautiful man who did some wonderful work and we would have seen great things from him. Right now I can't say that I'm too enthusiastic about just adding more fodder to what is already a horrendously, obscenely overblown machine that's gathered around his death. It's horrible.
22[on choosing film roles] I begin with a sense of mystery. In other words, I am intrigued by a life that seems very far removed from my own. And I have a sense of curiosity to discover that life and maybe change places with it for a while.
23[His acceptance speech for Best Actor In A Leading Role SAG award for There Will Be Blood (2007)] Thank you. I'm very, very proud of this. Thank you so much for giving it to me. And I'm very proud to be included in that group of wonderful actors this year. You know, for as long as I can remember, the thing that gave me a sense of wonderment, of renewal, the thing that teased me with the question, "How is such a thing possible?", and then dare you to go back into the arena one more time, with longing and self-doubt, jostling in the balance. It's always been the work of other actors, and there are many actors in this room tonight, including my fellow nominees, who have given that sense of regeneration and Heath Ledger gave it to me. In Monster's Ball (2001), that character that he created, it seemed to be almost like an unformed being, retreating from themselves, retreating from his father, from his life, even retreating from us, and yet we wanted to follow him, and yet we're scared to follow him almost. It was unique. And then, of course, in Brokeback Mountain (2005), he was unique, he was perfect. And that scene in the trailer at the end of the film is as moving as anything that I think I've ever seen. And I'd like to dedicate this to Heath Ledger. So, thank you very much. Thank you so much.
24Theatre invites a nuts-and-bolts process to rehearsing in which all the actors are transparent to each other. For me, even if the truth I am looking for might be a specious one, I still need to believe in a kernel of truth. And I find it hard to do in a rehearsal situation where everyone is saying, "Are you going to do it like that?" It is distracting and deadly in the end to any discovery you might make. I'm never far away from a sense of potential absurdity of what I am doing, and maybe as I get older I have to work harder and harder to obliterate it. That's maybe why I seem to take it far too seriously.
25[on the "wisdom" of actors as public figures] Initially it was invigorating. People suddenly wanted to hear my views on all manner of social problems. I was up for it but it palled very soon afterwards. It was not like real conversation, where you listen and learn. It's hard to learn anything when you are talking about it. You only learn doing it. And if you are not learning, what's the point?
26[on accepting the best actor Oscar for There Will Be Blood (2007)] This sprang like a sapling out of the mad, beautiful head of Paul Thomas Anderson.
27I have no illusion about the fact that I'm an Englishman living in Ireland. Even though I do straddle both worlds and I'm very proud to be able to carry both passports. But I do know where I come from. I particularly miss southeast London--the front-lines of Deptford and Lewisham and New Cross and Charlton--because that's my patch.
28I was very influenced by Ken Loach's work from the moment I saw Kes (1969) when I was a kid. It still remains for me one of the most powerful pieces of work ever. Before that, there was Saturday Night and Sunday Morning (1960), This Sporting Life (1963) and The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner (1962), which all expressed a new British social realism. Undoubtedly, they opened up the possibility of examining British life in a new way. That was probably the most important film experience I had.
29I do have dual citizenship, but I think of England as my country. I miss London very much but I couldn't live there because there came a time when I needed to be private and was forced to be public by the press. I couldn't deal with it.
30I am rather surprised that I haven't made more stories about my own country but it is a mistake to suggest that the biggest influence on my life in terms of movies has been America. It was and remains Ken Loach and his whole body of work, not that I have ever worked with him. There is something unique and pure about the way he works, without a taint on it. His beliefs have remained unwavering since he made
31Whenever we reach what we think are the boundaries of our endurance, you know ten minutes later you're thinking: "I could have done that"--like in any athletic pursuit--"I could have gone further than that; I could have jumped higher".
32[on why he takes long breaks between films] For my sense of continuity, I suppose I work in a certain way. But it goes beyond that. It's really about the sense of joy you have in having worked hard to imagine and discover and--one hopes--to create a world, an illusion of a world that other people might believe in because you believe in it yourself, a form of self-delusion. After achieving that, it seems far crazier to jump in and out of that world that you've gone to such pains to create. And it wouldn't be my wish to do that, because I enjoy being in there.
33My ambition for many years was to be involved in work that was utterly compelling to me, regardless of the consequences. But I worried a lot as a young man about where such and such a thing might take me; you're encouraged to think that way. You're supposed to build a career for yourself. But there's no part of me that was able to do that. And thank God I was able to recognize it before I sort of went grey with anxiety.
34[on creating a characterization] The intention is always the same. To try to discover life in its entirety, or at least create for yourself the illusion that you have, which might give you some chance of convincing other people of it. It's the same thing each time, but it requires totally different work in the process of achieving that. You are set on a path that's strewn with obstacles, but getting over them is the joy of the work. So it's impossible to think in terms of difficulty: it all seems utterly impossible, but the pleasure is in trying to forge ahead anyway.
35I don't particularly like westerns as a genre, but I do love certain westerns. High Noon (1952) means a lot to me--I love the purity and the honesty, I love Gary Cooper in that film, the idea of the last man standing. I do not like John Wayne--I find it hard to watch him. I just never took to him. And I don't like James Stewart as a cowboy. I love him, but just not as a cowboy; Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939) is one of my favorite films. I love Frank Capra. I love Preston Sturges. But we're talking about westerns . . . I have always admired Clint Eastwood's westerns. The spaghetti westerns were a great discovery. And Pale Rider (1985). As a child, the John Ford film Cheyenne Autumn (1964) made a big impression on me. And Five Easy Pieces (1970). It's not really a western, but it is about the possibilities that can be found in the West. Jack Nicholson is sublime in that film, just sublime. It's the most stultifying portrait of middle-class life. You want to flee from that world and head anywhere less civilized. Which is, of course, the appeal of the West: It's not tamed yet.
36I saw Taxi Driver (1976) five or six times in the first week, and I was astonished by its sheer visceral beauty. I just kept going back--I didn't know America, but that was a glimpse of what America might be, and I realized that, contrary to expectation, I wanted to tell American stories.
37Where I come from, it was a heresy to say you wanted to be in movies, leave alone American movies. We were all encouraged to believe that the classics of the theater were the fiery hoops through which you'd have to pass if you were going to have any self-esteem as a performer. It never occurred to me that that was the case. One of the great privileges of having grown up in a middle-class literary English household, but having gone to school in the front lines in Southeast London, was that I became half-street-urchin and half-good-boy at home. I knew that dichotomy was possible. England is obsessed with where you came from, and they are determined to keep you in that place, be it in a drawing room or in the gutter. The great tradition of liberalism in England is essentially a sponge that absorbs all possibility of change. America looked different to me: the idea of America as a place of infinite possibilities was defined for me through the movies. I'm glad I did the classical work that I did, but it just wasn't for me. I'm a little bit perverse, and I just hate doing the thing that's the most obvious.
38I used to go to all-night screenings of [Clint Eastwood] movies. I'd stagger out at 5 in the morning, trying to be loose-limbed and mean and taciturn.
39My love for American movies was like a secret that I carried around with me. I always knew I could straddle different worlds. I'd grown up in two different worlds and if you can grow up in two different worlds, you can occupy four. Or six. Why put a limit on it?
40I was deeply unsettled by the script [of There Will Be Blood (2007)]. For me, that is a sure sign. If you remain unsettled by a piece of writing, it means you are not watching the story from the outside; you've already taken a step toward it. When I'm drawn to something, I take a resolute step backward, and I ask myself if I can really serve this story as well as it needs to be served. If I don't think I can do that, no matter how appealing, I will decline. What finally takes over, what took over with this movie, is an illusion of inevitability. I think, "Can this really be true? Is this happening to me again? Is there no way to avoid this?".
41[on his reluctance to expose the mechanics of his acting process] It's not that I want to pull the shutters down. It's just that people have such a misconception about what it is I do. They think the character comes from staying in the wheelchair or being locked in the jail or whatever extravagant thing they choose to focus their fantasies on. Somehow, it always seems to have a self-flagellatory aspect to it. But that's just the superficial stuff. Most of the movies that I do are leading me toward a life that is utterly mysterious to me. My chief goal is to find a way to make that life meaningful to other people.
42[on applying to theater school, the Bristol Old Vic] I picked just one because then it would be a sign from the gods if it was not meant to be.
43[replying to a compliment on his articulation] I am more greatly moved by people who struggle to express themselves. Maybe it's a middle-class British hang-up, but I prefer the abstract concept of incoherence in the face of great feeling to beautiful, full sentences that convey little emotion.
44It was always assumed that the classics were a good line of work for me because I had a decent voice and the right nose. But anybody who comes from an essentially cynical European society is going to be bewitched by the sheer enthusiasm of the New World. And in America, the articulate use of language is often regarded with suspicion. Especially in the West. Look at the president. He could talk like an educated New Englander if he chose to. Instead, he holds his hands like a man who swings an ax. George W. Bush understands, very astutely, that many of the people who are going to vote for him would regard him less highly if he knew how to put words together. He would no longer be one of them. In Europe, the tradition is one of oratory. But in America, a man's man is never spendthrift with words. This, of course, is much more appealing in the movies than it is in politics.
45[on researching his role as Plainview in There Will Be Blood (2007)] I read a lot of correspondence dating from that period. Decent middle-class lives with wives and children were abandoned to pursue this elusive possibility. They were bank clerks and shipping agents and teachers. They all fled West for a sniff of cheap money. And they made it up as they went along. No one knew how to drill for oil. Initially, they scooped it out of the ground in saucepans. It was man at his most animalistic, sifting through filth to find bright, sparkly things.
46[on researching his role as Plainview in There Will Be Blood (2007)] Back then men would get the fever. They would keep digging, always with the idea that next time they'll throw the dice and the money will fall out of the sky. It killed a lot of men, it broke others, still more were reduced to despair and poverty, but they still believed in the promise of the West.
47[on researching his role as Plainview in There Will Be Blood (2007)] I like to learn about things. It was just a great time trying to conceive of the impossibility of that thing. I didn't know anything about mining at the turn of the century in America. My boarding school in Kent didn't exactly teach that.
48[on visiting the west of Ireland every year since childhood] From the day we arrived here, my sense of Ireland's importance has never diminished. Everything here seemed exotic to us. Just the sound of the west of Ireland in a person's voice can affect me deeply.
49[on obtaining Irish citizenship] I dare say it was still considered to be an abandonment of England! A betrayal! A heresy! It is not expected that someone from my background will leave England. But I've committed so many heresies that there's no sense in not making the final gesture.
50I came from the educated middle class but I identified with the working classes. Those were the people I looked up to. The lads whose fathers worked on the docks or in shipping yards or were shopkeepers. I knew that I wasn't part of that world, but I was intrigued by it. They had a different way of communicating. People who delight in conversation are often using that as a means to not say what is on their minds. When I became interested in theater, the work I admired was being done by working-class writers. It was often about the inarticulate. I later saw that same thing in Robert De Niro's early work--it was the most sublime struggle of a man trying to express himself. There was such poetry in that for me.
51[on working when he was a teenager as an extra in Sunday Bloody Sunday (1971)] I was just a local kid. I got to come out of the church, the same church where I sang in the choir, and scratch up a row of cars--a Jag, a Bentley--parked in front. I thought, "I get paid for this!". Years later I saw the director, John Schlesinger, at the Edinburgh festival, where we were showing My Beautiful Laundrette (1985). I play a hooligan punk in that, too. I said to Schlesinger, "I guess I haven't progressed much".
52The thing that Konstantin Stanislavski lays out is how you do the thing the first time every time - 1,000 times. That's the idea you're always searching for.
53Laurence Olivier might have been a much better actor on film if he hadn't had that flippant attitude. [He] was a remarkable actor, but he was entirely missing the point consistently. He felt that film was an inferior form.
54[on acting school] For a few years at school I tried to play the roles they wanted me to play, but it became less and less interesting to ponce around the place. Even now, when I sometimes think of doing a play, I think of rehearsal rooms and people hugging and everyone talking over cups of coffee because they are nervous. It's both very touching and it makes me a little nauseous and claustrophobic. Too much talk. I don't rehearse at all in film if I can help it. In talking a character through, you define it. And if you define it, you kill it dead.
55I've managed to create a sense of banishment in so many different areas of my life. I live in Ireland, not England. I make films in America. And now I'm banished from the theater because I've slagged it off so much. And I did the unspeakable thing of fleeing from "Hamlet".
56[T]here's a quality of wildness that exists in Ireland that coincides with utter solitude.
57Why would I want to play middle-aged, middle-class Englishmen?
58[while filming My Left Foot (1989)] I needed--and I still need--to create a particular environment. I need to find the right kind of silence or light or noise. Whatever is necessary--and it is always different. I know it sounds a little fussy and a little ridiculous, but finding your own rhythm is one of the most important things you can discover about yourself. And you have to observe it. As actors, we're all encouraged to feel that each job is the last job. They plant some little electrode in your head at an early stage and you think, "Be grateful, be grateful, be grateful". So it's not without a sense of gratitude that I work. But I couldn't do this work at all unless I did it in my own rhythm. It became a choice between stopping and taking the time I needed.
59[after filming The Unbearable Lightness of Being (1988)] I was hopelessly at sea. I was extremely unhappy most of the time. I think I probably felt I'd made a fundamental error in agreeing to do that movie even though it was the part and the film that everyone wanted to do. And God help us, that is, in itself, a reason not to do something.
60Playing the part of Christy Brown [in My Left Foot (1989)] left me with a sense of setting myself on a course, of trying to achieve something that was utterly out of reach.
61[on learning to box for The Boxer (1997)] I wanted to see if I loved the sport, because if I didn't love the sport, I wouldn't want to tell the story. At its best, boxing is very pure. It requires resilience and heart and self-belief even after it's been knocked out of you. It's a certain kind of a test. And it's hard: the training alone will kill you. And that's before people start giving you a dig.
62[on seeing his face on posters for The Last of the Mohicans (1992)] That was, and will always be, difficult for me. The work itself is never anything but pure pleasure, but there's an awful lot of peripheral stuff that I find it hard to be surrounded by. I like things to be swift, because the energy you have is concentrated and can be fleeting. The great machinery of film can work against that. I have never had a positive reaction to all the stuff that supposedly promotes the film. The thought of it will make me hesitate to do any films at all.
63Before I start a film, there is always a period where I think, "I'm not sure I can do this again". I remember that before I was going to start There Will Be Blood (2007), I wondered why I had said yes. When Martin Scorsese told me about Bill the Butcher in Gangs of New York (2002), I wanted to change places with that man. But even then, I did not say yes right away. I kept thinking, "I'm not sure I can do this again".
64[on disengaging from a character after filming] There's a terrible sadness. The last day of shooting is surreal. Your mind, your body, your spirit are not in any way prepared to accept that this experience is coming to an end. In the months that follow the finish of a film, you feel profound emptiness. You've devoted so much of your time to unleashing, in an unconscious way, some sort of spiritual turmoil, and even if it's uncomfortable, no part of you wishes to leave that character behind. The sense of bereavement is such that it can take years before you can put it to rest.
65[on playing Jack Slevin in The Ballad of Jack and Rose (2005)] I was, as always, wary of taking on the role. This was a man whose soul was torn, and once you've adopted that kind of internal conflict, it's difficult to quiet.
66The West has always been the epicenter of possibility. One of the ways we forge against mortality is to head west. It's to do with catching the sun before it slips behind the horizon. We all keep moving toward the sun, wishing to get the last ray of hope before it sets.
67Life comes first. What I see in the characters, I first try to see in life.
68[on 'Martin Scorsese' (Fqv)] Martin doesn't have to convince me about anything. I can only say that I would wish for any one of my colleagues to have the experience of working with Marty once in their lifetime. If you get it twice, it's a privilege that you don't necessarily look for but you certainly don't try to avoid.
69In every actor's life, there is a moment when they ask themselves, "Is it really seemly for me to still be doing this?".
70[on whether or not he will act in films more often in the future] Nothing happened over the course of making Gangs of New York (2002) that made me think, "Why don't I do this more often?".
71I suppose I have a highly developed capacity for self-delusion, so it's no problem for me to believe I'm somebody else.
72[on acting] If I weren't allowed this outlet, there wouldn't be a place for me in society.

#Trademark
1Is very selective in his role choices
2Renown for his eloquent acceptance speeches
3Hoop earrings
4Dramatic emotional performances
5Rich dramatic voice
6His characters are often deeply unsympathetic
7His skill with accents
8Frequently collaborates with directors Jim Sheridan and Martin Scorsese.
9In-depth and exhaustive preparations for roles

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